Kevin Honeycutt has a positive message for parents, teachers and students

This year’s Positive Choices speaker was not only entertaining but offered his audiences valuable information about the internet.

By Angel Wyrwas

This year’s Positive Choices speaker was not only entertaining but offered his audiences valuable information about the internet. Kevin Honeycutt spoke to a small gathering of adults Sept. 19 and addressed the Baker students and teachers the following day.

Honeycutt introduced himself as an art teacher/football coach from Kansas. He described his childhood and how he was the first one in his family to graduate high school and then college. He shared how he grew up in poverty, moving often and eventually was placed in foster care. “I know where I’m from,” said Honeycutt.

Today Honeycutt is an award winning Technology Integration Specialist that speaks to students and educators all over the world. His message was about digital legacy and what that means. “Our kids will spend the rest of their lives in the future. Are we getting them ready?” he asked.

Honeycutt asked how will we craft our digital legacy and warned about thinking before posting online. “You may think that comment or picture won’t last, but it does,” said Honeycutt, “and it can ruin you. Provable stupidity is findable. How you act, your character, matters.”

He talked about how students today have always had technology available to them. “When I was growing up, we had computers as big as houses and cell phones came in bags that you had to hold with two hands,” laughed Honeycutt. “The smart phone has more technology in it than Apollo. But how we use technology will largely determine our future.”

“I’m 50,” said Honeycutt, “but I’m pretty good at this stuff.” Almost all information is available online and he offered websites and apps that could be used for creating music and fabric, building a business or publishing a book. He shared stories of students who were selling products online and other students using technology to help people around the world.

Honeycutt then played several songs on his guitar as students used an app to play accompanying music. One student from Wibaux played some incredible drum music on an Apple drum pad.

He closed his presentation with a challenge to ‘do something great’. “I want to share your story,” said Honeycutt.

      



GAMES

Add Comment