Missoula Children’s Theatre Workshops

Matthew Windham and Joe Godburn of the Missoula Children’s Theater held workshops for the Plevna School students K-12, as well as helped them put on a wonderful play, Peter and Wendy.

6-12th performing improv from Joe Godburn.

By Jessica Paul

Matthew Windham and Joe Godburn of the Missoula Children’s Theater held workshops for the Plevna School students K-12, as well as helped them put on a wonderful play, Peter and Wendy.

3-5th grade learning the Action Telephone Game.

The kindergarten, first grade, and second grade all enjoyed a workshop on moving, thinking, and talking like a character. After listening to how to do it, they then each experienced talking, thinking and moving like a character. The third, fourth, and fifth grades participated in a sound to action telephone game. First, they came up with a sound and an action to go with it, and then they would tell the person next to them. After the person next to them had listened to the sound and watched the action, they would repeat it and come up with their own. They also used three objects to create an item, and then everybody else had to figure out what they were making.

Grades 6 – 12 partook in an improvisation workshop. They played several different games learning that it takes cooperation, “yes and,” and a plethora of fast thinking to become a good improv actor.  Their first game was “Yes And.” Several students formed a line, and one student started with a sentence. Then, the next student would say “yes and,” with their own sentence adding to the story. After four or five “yes ands”, the silly story was created. Next, they played “Fortunately or Unfortunately”. This game started the same as the first, but instead of saying “yes and” they said unfortunately, and then the person next to them would say fortunately going down the line of students creating an entertaining improv story. “Your Highness” was the next game, and the citizens of the village brought the King all of their problems, which he had to solve. The last and final game the 6 – 12 played was “Why are you late?” In this game, there was a student who was late for class, a curious teacher, and the late student’s best friend. The two acted out why the student was late for class as the teacher questioned the student about his/her reasons for being late. The student must come up with the story based on what his/her friend is acting out. After taking part in some of these activities, the students realized that improv does work better with cooperation, “yes and” answers, as well as fast thinking.

      



GAMES