Bang! Bang! President Obama kills Keystone pipeline

   One week ago today on November 6, President Barack Obama said ‘no’ to the request from TransCanada to build the Keystone XL Pipeline.

By Sherry Vogel

This ends a seven year review of the construction project. Issues concerning energy, the economy and its impact on climate changes fueled the fury against the controversial pipeline. Green movement activists who battled over climate change majorly influenced Obama. They have marched and rallied in front of the White House for the past four years.

   Obama believed that the pipeline wouldn’t be a silver bullet for the economy. He stated, “The pipeline would not make a meaningful long term contribution to our economy.”

   The U.S. State Department contended that the U.S. couldn’t approve Keystone XL while purporting to be a global leader on climate action. As TransCanada abandons its North-South Keystone Pipeline XL, it is focusing on the West-East with East Energy Pipeline. This will span 2,858 miles and is designed to move eleven million barrels of crude oil a day from Alberta and Saskatchewan refineries in eastern Canada.

   On a local level, how is a local city leader responding to the Nov. 6 announcement? City Mayor Clayton Hornung stated, “I don’t agree with Obama when he stated that the pipeline did not have a meaningful positive impact on the economy.” Hornung added, “TransCanada made a large impact on Baker as it funded $4 million into Baker City projects for upgrade to infrastructure.” Baker’s city water and sewer lines were replaced with money from TransCanada, as well as county contributions. “One of the biggest hits the local area will take is the loss of all the state of Montana and Fallon County revenues which are lost,” Hornung concluded.

   One week ago today on November 6, President Barack Obama said ‘no’ to the request from TransCanada to build the Keystone XL Pipeline. This ends a seven year review of the construction project. Issues concerning energy, the economy and its impact on climate changes fueled the fury against the controversial pipeline. Green movement activists who battled over climate change majorly influenced Obama. They have marched and rallied in front of the White House for the past four years.

   Obama believed that the pipeline wouldn’t be a silver bullet for the economy. He stated, “The pipeline would not make a meaningful long term contribution to our economy.”

   The U.S. State Department contended that the U.S. couldn’t approve Keystone XL while purporting to be a global leader on climate action. As TransCanada abandons its North-South Keystone Pipeline XL, it is focusing on the West-East with East Energy Pipeline. This will span 2,858 miles and is designed to move eleven million barrels of crude oil a day from Alberta and Saskatchewan refineries in eastern Canada.

   On a local level, how is a local city leader responding to the Nov. 6 announcement? City Mayor Clayton Hornung stated, “I don’t agree with Obama when he stated that the pipeline did not have a meaningful positive impact on the economy.” Hornung added, “TransCanada made a large impact on Baker as it funded $4 million into Baker City projects for upgrade to infrastructure.” Baker’s city water and sewer lines were replaced with money from TransCanada, as well as county contributions. “One of the biggest hits the local area will take is the loss of all the state of Montana and Fallon County revenues which are lost,” Hornung concluded.