Recreation at Medicine Rocks

   Medicine Rocks State Park located 25 miles south of Baker on Highway 7 is an often forgotten place for recreation in the local area.

By Lori Kesinger

Photo by Lori Kesinger One of the many unique formations of sandstone rock at Medicine Rocks State Park that can be seen on a short hike.
Photo by Lori Kesinger
One of the many unique formations of sandstone rock at Medicine Rocks State Park that can be seen on a short hike.

Sandstone rock formations form a unique landscape rarely seen in many other places. People have etched thousands of inscriptions on the sandstones dating back hundreds of years.

   Medicine Rocks got its name from the many Native Americans who came there to pau-wau, or powwow in English. Native Americans held these ceremonies to celebrate a successful hunt or to spiritually prepare a warrior for an impending battle. Sitting Bull even powwowed at Medicine Rocks. Native Americans also met at Medicine Rocks before going to meet General George A. Custer at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

   Theodore Roosevelt called Medicine Rocks “fantastically beautiful”. He used to camp there when he was herding cattle.

   Today, visitors can enjoy hiking, climbing, biking, photography, and viewing the historical inscriptions. There are 12 campsites also available.

   You can find out more about Medicine Rocks and other Montana State Parks at:  stateparks.mt.gov